Are you addicted
to your smartphone?

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The Book

Too Much of a Good Thing: Are You addicted to Your Smartphone?


With his current effort, Dr. Roberts asks readers if they may be getting “Too Much of a Good Thing” regarding their smartphone use. This is no hoity-toity treatise but a fun and humorous look at our attachment (addiction?) to our smart phones. In chapter two you can respond to 12 short statements and see for yourself. Are you addicted to your smart phone? And, if you are, “What’s the big deal?” In chapter three, experts tell us whether we can actually be addicted to our smart phones. The act of phubbing (phone snubbing) and its impact on your relationships is broached in chapters 4-6.

But the fun doesn’t stop there. Chapter seven offers a crash course on smart phone etiquette while chapter eight shares some interesting (and often sobering) facts about driving while distracted. Chapter nine debunks the four myths about multitasking and how our phones may undermine our productivity at school and work. Finally, he offers some easy solutions to all this telephony. Smart Phone Smack Down is all about carving out some time away from your smart phone so you can explore all the wonders available off-line if you just take a few minutes to power down. This is a life changing book and a journey that Dr. Roberts looks forward to sharing with you. So, put your smart phone on “airplane mode” and let’s get started.

 


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About the Author

Dr. James A. Roberts is an award winning author. His research on smartphone use (over-use?) and quality of life issues has been published in top journals and has received wide-spread media coverage.

James A. Roberts is a well-known author with approximately 100 articles published in the academic literature. He is currently the Ben H. Williams Professor of Marketing at Baylor University in Waco, Texas where he has been a faculty member since 1991. “Too Much of a Good Thing” (his second book) follows closely on the heels of his highly successful first book, “Shiny Objects”, which focused its attention on how our love of money and material possessions impacts our happiness.

Dr. Roberts is a nationally recognized expert on human/consumer behavior and has studied one form or another of addictive behavior for the past 15 years.

He has been quoted extensively in the media and has appeared on the CBS Early Show, ABC World News Tonight, NBC’s The Today Show, Yahoo.com’s “The Daily Ticker”, and has been quoted or featured on The O’Reilly Factor, US News & World Report, the New York Times, USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio, Cosmopolitan Magazine, Yahoo! Tech (one million page views), and countless other newspapers, magazines, websites, and television appearances.

Some Fun Facts About Smartphone Usage!

  • 66% of Americans who own a smartphone.

  • 64% of adult Americans who own a smartphone.

  • 57% who use their phone to do online banking.

  • 18% who use their phone to submit a job application.

62% of smartphone owners have used their phone in the past year to look up information about a health condition.

 

Select Media Appearances

Dr. Roberts has appeared on NBC, CBS, and ABC and numerous radio programs and has been quoted in nearly every major newspaper, magazine, and extensively across the web. He also has been a frequent guest on public radio.

CBS Early ShowAuthor Explores Our Material World

I appeared on the CBS early Show on Monday, December 5th to talk about my book, Shiny Objects: Why we spend money we don’t have in search of happiness we can’t buy!

ABC World News TonightThe Money Trap

“Overspending is part of our culture. We are constantly bombarded with advertising messages that happiness can be purchased at the mall or on the internet or from a catalog… “technology, cars, homes, vacations, private school education for our children, there’s no end to it.”

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New York TimesThe More Sensible Sex? It’s a lie.

There are “his and her” spending patterns…but the desires that motivate consumption are only superficially different. “Women generally value their appearance more than men, which can lead to retail therapy; men value social recognition…both trying to build self esteem from different directions.” Women tend to doubt their financial acumen might shop “in order to take comfort in the trappings of financial success.” Men, more optimistic, just want to strut their stuff. “How big your collection of power tools or music boils down to feelings of self-worth.”

USA TodayIdea of simple life takes hold.

“They’re all onto something,” says James Roberts, a professor of marketing at Baylor University in Waco, TX. “The research is overwhelmingly clear…The more materialistic you are, the less happy you are…we’ve been told by Madison Avenue that happiness can come through the mail.”

Cosmopolitan MagazineRx for Compulsive Spending

According to Baylor University Professor James Roberts, “impulse buying is epidemic.” His study of college students found that those who watch a lot of TV, carry many credit cards, hang out at malls, and worry about the future tend to spend money they don’t have because it makes them feel good for a little while, anyway.

Wall Street Journal Classroom EditionCard Tricks

James A. Roberts, a professor of marketing at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, has studied compulsive buying among college students and calls credit cards “spending facilitators.” He notes that with cash, it’s impossible to spend more than you actually”…but “what we’ve found is the money involved in credit cards is somewhat abstract,” he says. In fact…students leaving the school bookstore who paid with cash or check knew pretty much what they had spent. But, he says, “those who paid by credit card tended to be off by as much as 60%.”

Women’s Wall Street JournalConquer the Compulsive Shopping Blues

Dr. James Roberts suggests at least a 24-hour cooling off period before you buy something. “If something’s over $100, walk out of the store. If you still want it the next day, you probably really wanted it or needed it so it’s okay to go back and get it,” says Roberts, a professor of marketing at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, who has studied chronic purchasing behavior for several years.

Health Magazine (also CNN.com)Card Tricks

James A. Roberts, a professor of marketing at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, has studied compulsive buying among college students and calls credit cards “spending facilitators.” He notes that with cash, it’s impossible to spend more than you actually”…but “what we’ve found is the money involved in credit cards is somewhat abstract,” he says. In fact…students leaving the school bookstore who paid with cash or check knew pretty much what they had spent. But, he says, “those who paid by credit card tended to be off by as much as 60%.”

Kiplinger.comBest Time for First Credit Card

Kiplinger.com Janet Bodnar’s Money Smart Kids column about the right time to give credit cards to young people quotes James A. Roberts, marketing professor at Baylor’s Hankamer School of Business – Credit cards can be a good financial tool. But kids can get into trouble if they rush to get one before they’re ready for the responsibility.

Contact

 Waco, TX

 Jim_Roberts@baylor.edu